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How It's Made: The American Flag

Have you wondered how American Flags are made? What they are made out of? The history of this symbol is rich and stitches between the red, white, and blue fabric are made out of more than just fabric. The fabric that an American Flag is made out of, like most things in American history, has changed throughout time. Since MMI Textiles, Inc. is  proud to sell many products are made right here in the USA, it got us thinking about the flag and how it is changed over time and thought you might be wondering the same thing.

 

Since 1776, the flag has been made from different things. In the early years, American flags were made out of wool, cotton, linen, or silk depending on where it was being made within the country. Goods and materials didn’t travel anywhere near as fast as they do today so therefore, the kind of fabric that was already close by was probably the fabric used. As one could imagine, flags made from silk were typically more expensive and used in the military and for special occasions, sometimes related to occasions involving the federal government. In 1865, laws were put into place that allowed the federal government only purchase flag materials from American manufacturer. We can see a lot of similar things and laws in place now related to buying USA produced good and materials that are Berry compliant.

Today, while the fabric has changed, an American flag is usually manufactured with a material that depends on where it will be flown. Flag manufacturers are always looking to use improved fabric that offers outdoor flags better wearability and better resistance to sunlight and weathering. Indoor flags, decorative flags, and ones that won’t be exposed to too much weathering will be made out of softer fabrics like cottons. The ones for outdoor uses are typically made from nylon or polyester. Nylon, which is typically a little bit lighter than polyester, waves in the wind as one might think a flag should wave.  
 

As new fabrics, smart fabrics, and other materials are introduced to the fabric industry, chances are that the flag will continue to evolve. The stars and stripe will continue to mean more than just the fabric that is sewn together and now you know just a little more about it! 

Author

Annie