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5 Things You Didn't Know Were Made with Webbing

by Annie 27. April 2016 11:05


Webbing comes in lots of different varieties and you wouldn’t even believe all the things that are made from or with webbing included. If you currently use webbing or are just interested in learning a little more about this fabric, check out this list of five things you might not have noticed are made from different kinds of webbing.  

Seat belts

One of the most common uses of webbing is in seat belts in most cars. Nylon webbing is the most popular kind of webbing that’s used. While widths can vary depending on the maker of the car, two-inch webbing is mostly commonly used. Next time you’re in the car, notice the webbing in the seat belt that you have.
 

Dog Leases and Dog Collars

These things are a must if you have a dog or thinking about getting one! Thanks to leashes and collars webbing is made in all sorts of different sizes and colors. And just like seat belts, leashes and collars are made with some kind of hardware, too. Luckily for you, if you’re needing to make these pet-related products, MMI carries both the webbing and the hardware.
 

 Lawn Chairs

Those retro-looking lawn chairs that have been around for years? Yep, they are made with webbing, too! The webbing is woven into the pattern that is seen on the bottom and the backs of lawn chairs. It’s sometimes dyed many different colors to attain that bright and retro look.
 
 

Molle Systems

This fabric system is an acronym standing for Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment. Webbing is used as a holder for many different things typically in military wear and equipment. It’s used in a lot of tactical assault panels, rucksacks, and modular pouches, vests, and backpacks. In this case, we carry a lot of mil-spec webbing options and Berry Compliant products.


Yoga Straps  

As this kind of exercise becomes more popular, yoga straps and yoga mat carrying straps are becoming more popular too. In many cases, cotton webbing is used in these straps to achieve the softer feel that these products try to attain. The carrying cases and the straps used in the stretching are both growing more and more popular. 

How It's Made: The American Flag

by Annie 20. April 2016 11:10

Have you wondered how American Flags are made? What they are made out of? The history of this symbol is rich and stitches between the red, white, and blue fabric are made out of more than just fabric. The fabric that an American Flag is made out of, like most things in American history, has changed throughout time. Since MMI Textiles, Inc. is  proud to sell many products are made right here in the USA, it got us thinking about the flag and how it is changed over time and thought you might be wondering the same thing.

 

Since 1776, the flag has been made from different things. In the early years, American flags were made out of wool, cotton, linen, or silk depending on where it was being made within the country. Goods and materials didn’t travel anywhere near as fast as they do today so therefore, the kind of fabric that was already close by was probably the fabric used. As one could imagine, flags made from silk were typically more expensive and used in the military and for special occasions, sometimes related to occasions involving the federal government. In 1865, laws were put into place that allowed the federal government only purchase flag materials from American manufacturer. We can see a lot of similar things and laws in place now related to buying USA produced good and materials that are Berry compliant.

Today, while the fabric has changed, an American flag is usually manufactured with a material that depends on where it will be flown. Flag manufacturers are always looking to use improved fabric that offers outdoor flags better wearability and better resistance to sunlight and weathering. Indoor flags, decorative flags, and ones that won’t be exposed to too much weathering will be made out of softer fabrics like cottons. The ones for outdoor uses are typically made from nylon or polyester. Nylon, which is typically a little bit lighter than polyester, waves in the wind as one might think a flag should wave.  
 

As new fabrics, smart fabrics, and other materials are introduced to the fabric industry, chances are that the flag will continue to evolve. The stars and stripe will continue to mean more than just the fabric that is sewn together and now you know just a little more about it! 

Important Update: PenCott™ Camouflage

by Debbie 13. April 2016 14:35

We know camouflage here at MMI. That’s why when we teamed up with Hyde Definition to offer their PenCott™ Mission-Critical Camouflage we knew it was a good idea. The PenCott™ Multi-Environment Camouflage Pattern Family is the culmination of independent research and development, and builds upon decades of experience with thousands of camouflage designs to find the optimum solution for global operating environments. It’s proven and used around the world and we are proud to be able to offer it.

Why PenCott™? The benefits are numerous.  The pattern is naturalistic, omni-directional, multi-scalar, fractal-based, 3-in-1 pattern geometry. It also offers a unique combination of features help you avoid detection more effectively. Pictures are worth a thousand words and we think these pictures are the best representation of how good PenCott™ works. Check out PenCott™ in action.

Another thing we love about PenCott™ is that our 500D Nylon Corduras and NyCo Ripstops are printed to US military specification standards. Lightweight polyester is also an option. Within this line of PenCott™ offers four different patterns: GreenZone™, SandStorm™, BadLands™, and SnowDrift™. All four of these camouflage patterns offer superior shape disruption and texture matching across multiple operating environments and distances. 

We’d be happy to send you samples of our 50/50 NyCo Ripstop, our 500D Cordura Nylon with DWR finish, or our 50D Polyester.  As well as get you more information on the fabrics we print on or the patterns themselves.  Feel free to email our PenCott™ experts at info@mmitextiles.com or call in at 440.899.8050. 

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A Quick History of Polyester

by Annie 6. April 2016 10:36

Woven fabrics have a rich history. And sometimes, after dealing with them so often, it can be helpful to reexamine the history of them and what makes them such a useful and staple part of the industry and of MMI Textiles, Inc. Polyester is a versatile fabric that is used when durability is a necessary attribute.
 

In the early 1940’s the fabric industry was booming. For a few years, polyester took a back seat to nylon but once it was thoroughly developed and ready to be launched, it was introduced to the American public in 1951. It was marketed as a “magic” fabric that needed no ironing and was extremely wrinkle resistant. The fabric continued gaining traction in the textile industry and came a comparatively inexpensive and very durable option for textile needs.

 

From there, it only makes sense that different blends and microfibers of polys were created that offered a different feel and different qualities. It is especially used in outerwear when durability and tenacity are of the utmost importance. In addition, it can be coated with a water-resistant coating, like DWR, which makes it more ideal for outdoor uses. Its ability to keep its shape and refrain from wrinkling also makes it a good option for shirts, pants, suits, and bed sheets especially when blended with other fibers. It’s a popular option within households for drapes and tapestries. It's also commonly used to make ropes, films, and sails. Clearly, polyester is versatile with a wide range of uses in several different industries. 

 

MMI Textiles, Inc. carries a handful of options of polyesters and polyester blends. If polyester is what you are looking for, check out our dedicated page. Keep in mind that we also have experience with a large amount of projects that include polyester fabrics so it’s easy for us to fill you in on what kinds you might need for a project that might be on deck. We can send out samples too, so that you can see for yourself the different kinds that we can offer you. Call us at 440.899.8050 or send us a quick email at info@mmitextiles.com to get questions answered or samples sent. 

Source: http://schwartz.eng.auburn.edu/polyester/uses.html

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MMI Textiles
29260 Clemens Rd. Bldg. II, Ste. B
Westlake, OH 441456
phone: 888.664.0086
phone: 440.899.8050
fax: 440.899.8055
info@mmitextiles.com

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